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Protecting Alaska's Cook Inlet watershed and the life it sustains since 1995.
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Local Food

By supporting local foods, we reduce our collective food miles and make meaningful impacts that bolster local communities and take action against climate change.

95% of food in Alaska comes from Outside, mostly shipped to the Port of Anchorage and distributed from there.
95% of food in Alaska comes from Outside, mostly shipped to the Port of Anchorage and distributed from there.
In 1955, roughly 55% of food for Alaskans was produced in Alaska. Today, we have 680 farms across the state but 95% of our food comes from Outside (ADN, Nov. 4, 2013). We see numerous problems with this, including the climate impacts of transportation, lack of food security for Alaskans and a need for Alaskan farmers and fishers to be economically viable in our communities.

Successful local producers and fishers connect people to the land, our water and our resources. We see examples of success in our wild fisheries, and in some of our agricultural sectors. But there is clearly a huge amount of growth potential for Alaskans to be successful in producing food and other goods that will feed and sustain our communities far into the future.

Home grown food reduces food miles and is part of the climate revolution!
Home grown food reduces food miles and is part of the climate revolution!
The local food movement depends on long-term responsible land management, with healthy and functioning watersheds for clean water and clean soil. Robust local food systems depend on engaged communities that understand and work towards healthy watersheds, clean water and clean soil. While these principles aren’t currently common in local foods discourse, Inletkeeper receives a steady stream of questions about soil health (metals, hydrocarbons, legacy spills, etc) and water quality (bacteria, metals, irrigation) from people concerned about the health of their food from their farms and gardens. The answers to these questions all tie back into the health of their surrounding lands and streams, and ultimately their entire watershed.

Food Hub

In addition to providing resources to farmers on how to protect water quality and watershed health, Inletkeeper is spearheading a pilot online food hub on the Kenai Peninsula. To find out more about this exciting project, check out our food hub page.

 

Farm/Garden Workshops

April 2015 - Homer

How Does Your Garden Grow

You can see the presentation from our workshop. (3.2MB .pdf file)

Water Quality & Farming Resources

Caring for your onsite septic system in Alaska. AK Dept. of Environmental Conservation

Alaska Heating Oil Tanks - A complete guide for property owners. AK Dept. of Environmental Conservation

Arsenic and Our Gardens. Article by L.Clayton in the 2012 Central Peninsula Garden Club newsletter. (PDF download)

Calculating Fertilizer Application Rates. Colorado State University Extension.

Kenai Peninsula Invasive Plants information.

Dealing with High Soluble Salt Levels in High Tunnels. Penn State Extension

Changing pH in Soil. University of California Cooperative Extension (PDF download)

Food Safety in the Home Garden. University of California Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources (PDF download)

Soil Sampling. University of Alaska Cooperative Extension

Water Quality Concerns for Ponds. Penn State Cooperative Extension.

Water Rights in Alaska. Inletkeeper's overview page, with links to DNR.

 

Food Policy & Security Resources

Alaska Food Policy Council

Alaska Farm to School Program